Scaling a Project: As Easy As Alpha, Beta, Charlie

Posted by KJ Sanchez On December - 11 - 2012

KJ Sanchez

As the CEO of American Records, a theater company devoted to making work that chronicles our time/work that serves as a bridge between people, scale is always on my mind and an important part of how we produce.

For your information, I’m the CEO, not the artistic director because American Records is an S Corp, not a nonprofit. We have the soul of a nonprofit in that every dollar we make we spend on artists and programing (i.e. we have no profit margin), which allows us to work under the fiscal sponsorship of Fractured Atlas.

This is a great partnership because being a corporation keeps us light and lean and able to work very quickly, and the fiscal sponsorship allows for grants for particular projects. Right now, our average earned/contributed ratio is 80/20 (80% earned, 20% contributed). We’re not the only ones pioneering this model. Rainpan 43 Performance Group and Universes are also S Corps with fiscal sponsorship. Other companies are pioneering the L3C.

I bring up our company structure because it is fundamentally tied to how we work on scale. The way we’re working on “going big” and the reason we have such a high level of earned income is because we tour. Our tours go to traditional theaters like Actors Theater of Louisville and Roundhouse and traditional presenters like The Hopkins Center at Dartmouth but we also tour to conferences, hospitals, lecture halls, and military bases.

Last year I contracted with the Department of Defense to take our play ReEntry to Army bases throughout Germany and Italy, where command used the performances as post-deployment training. ABC News covered the play as part of a larger story about veteran suicide and post-traumatic stress disorder. Read the rest of this entry »

‘Beertown’ — Making a Show That Builds Community

Posted by Rachel Grossman On May - 3 - 2012

The official "Beertown" time capsule.

In September 2010, dog & pony dc (d&pdc) began developing a new show starting with nothing but two books and a question. Our goal was to create an original work as a collective from start to finish; the only thing we knew about the end product was that it would be fully produced 14 months later. Well: we also knew that in this production we wanted to push the boundaries of “audience integration.”

d&pdc is an ensemble-based devised theatre company that creates new ways for audiences to experience theatre. We carry a self-described “healthy obsession” with defining the performer-audience relationship for each show.

“Audience integration” is a foundation of d&pdc’s devising process; the audience’s role in performance is discussed from each project’s birth to its fully-realized production. The approach is highly elastic. On one end of the spectrum: the role of the audience is as witness. At the opposite end: the event doesn’t move forward without audience propulsion.

In 2010, we wanted to explore the more risky end. We wanted to create a show in which the audience members were active, vocal participants who ultimately determined the outcome every night. To do that, the audience had to feel compelled to act; they had to become invested and take ownership. In other words: they had to care.

What makes us care? “A crisis” was our initial answer. Read the rest of this entry »

Smart Phones & Theater: Godspell’s Tweet Seats Spread the Word

Posted by Tim Mikulski On March - 26 - 2012

We’ve all been in a play when a phone goes off. Sometimes we see the actors react, while other times the show just continues.

Up until recently, it was forbidden to keep that phone on during a show, but thanks to experiments by local/regional theaters, the idea of “Tweet seats” has grown to Broadway via the new Godspell revival:

We’ve heard all sides of this issue:

Cell phones are just the new “individually wrapped candy wrapper.”

The fad of “Tweet seats” is just a marketing gimmick. Read the rest of this entry »

The Critical Supporting Role of Curation in Making Innovation Possible

Posted by Ian David Moss On July - 26 - 2011

Ian David Moss

Through the work of the [Emerging Leaders Council] Emerging Ideas Committee this year, I’ve become acquainted with a wealth of new approaches to old problems and exciting combinations of existing models about which I was previously unaware. You’re seeing some examples of them on the Blog Salon this week, and we’ll be sharing more on this space as the year goes on.

For every strong example of innovation we highlight, however, I’m sure there are five more that we missed. Not because they were not among the ones we chose, but because they were never even brought to our attention.

Part of the nature of being “under the radar” is that it’s hard for people who rely on conventional information sources to find you. The five young arts professionals on our committee set out at the beginning of the year to identify novel, smart projects that weren’t getting attention from the field as a whole. We used what resources we had at our disposal – most notably, our connection to the 30+ local Emerging Leader Networks around the country – but inevitably, our ability to “spot” innovative ventures is determined to a significant extent by those ventures’ visibility. Read the rest of this entry »

ARTSblog holds week-long Blog Salons, a series of posts by guest bloggers, that focus on an overarching theme within a core area of Americans for the Arts' work. Here are links to the most recent Salons:

Arts Education

Teaching Artists

Early Arts Education

Common Core Standards

Quality, Engagement & Partnerships

Emerging Leaders

Charting the Future of the Arts

Taking Communities to the Next Level

New Methods & Models

Public Art

Best Practices

Evaluation

Arts Marketing

Audience Engagement

Winning Audiences

Powered by Community

Animating Democracy

Arts & the Military

Scaling Up Programs & Projects

Social Impact & Evaluation

Humor & Social Change

Private Sector Initatives

Arts & Business Partnerships

Business Models in the Arts

Local Arts Agencies

Cultural Districts

Economic Development

Trends, Collaborations & Audiences

Art in Rural Communities

Alec Baldwin and Nigel Lythgoe talk about the state of the arts in America at Arts Advocacy Day 2012. The acclaimed actor and famed producer discuss arts education and what inspires them.