Theresa Cameron

Theresa Cameron

I’m so excited to welcome you to our blog salon devoted solely to arts, entertainment, and cultural districts. Wondering what exactly we’re talking about? We loosely define a cultural district as: “…a well-recognized, labeled, mixed-use area of a city in which a high concentration of cultural facilities serves as the anchor of attraction and robust economic activity.”

A few important bits of information:

  • More than 600 communities in the U.S. have designated cultural districts.
  • Some cities have formal boundary lines with specific zoning ordinances and economic tax incentives.
  • Others have more informal, unofficial boundaries that become a marketing focal point to cluster arts organizations.
  • Twelve states have enacted statewide arts, entertainment, and cultural district legislation.

Since the late 1990s, Americans for the Arts has been monitoring the growth of arts, entertainment, and cultural districts across the United States, documenting their location, and reviewing, in relevant cases, their legislation of creation. In 1998 Americans for the Arts published the Cultural Districts Handbook, a first of its kind guide for establishing and developing districts. The Handbook examined districts in 24 U.S. cities. Since the Handbook’s publication, however, the number of districts has grown. Given the phenomenal rate at which the district model has been and continues to be adopted across the country, there is a clear and compelling need for new technical assistance and training resources designed to meet the unique needs of those charged with creating, maintaining, and evaluating districts.

districtSo with the help of the National Endowment for the Arts we have embarked on a new project to help us provide more up to date information, tools, and resources on cultural districts.

To kick our project off, we hosted our first preconference on arts, entertainment, and cultural districts in Pittsburgh this June. We had over 150 attendees from the United States and Canada. The presenters were so terrific we decided to ask them to share their insights with all of you through this blog salon. Be sure to check back every day this week for new posts! Enjoy.

One Response to “Welcome to the Cultural Districts Blog Salon”

  1. North East Ohio Area has been ‘branded’ as the Home of the Environmental Art(s) Movement by the International Center for Environmental Arts (ICEA) to foster civic identity, cultivate tourism, and brand Ohio Environmental Arts and Culture in the Bio-Region.

    BACKGROUND CHECK by Christa Herbert:
    — The Environmental Arts Movement was professionally organized by the The International Center for Environmental Arts (ICEA) founded by David and Renate Jakupca in 1987.
    — Environmental Art is the true indigenous art form of the greater Cleveland, Ohio area.
    — The ARK in Berea is the global home to the Environmental Art Movement.
    — David Jakupca is the recognized leader and the Spiritual Father of the Environmental Art Movement.
    — The ‘Theory of Iceality on Environmental Arts’ is now considered as the cornerstone of the modern sustainable global Environmental Art Movement and the concept is now replicated by urban designers, architects and artists throughout the World.
    — In 1993 in Vienna, Austria at the World Conference on Human Rights, ICEA, with the approval of U.S. Delegates, Jimmy Carter and Geraldine Ferraro, began recycling and promoting United Nations’ World Conferences until 2007..
    — Through this partnership with the United Nations, ICEA has influenced a global audience of literally billions of people.
    — Environmental Art was used by the National Endowment for the Arts as part of their 1997 American Canvas Project that is currently used in all 50 States.
    — In 2000, David and Renate Jakupca were appointed American Cultural Ambassadors representing the US at EXPO2000, The Worlds Fair held in Hanover, Germany.
    — Environmental Art is the number one Art Movement in Ohio
    — Environmental Art is the number one Art Movement in America.
    — Environmental Art is the number one Art Movement Worldwide.

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ARTSblog holds week-long Blog Salons, a series of posts by guest bloggers, that focus on an overarching theme within a core area of Americans for the Arts' work. Here are links to the most recent Salons:

Arts Education

Teaching Artists

Early Arts Education

Common Core Standards

Quality, Engagement & Partnerships

Emerging Leaders

Charting the Future of the Arts

Taking Communities to the Next Level

New Methods & Models

Public Art

Best Practices

Evaluation

Arts Marketing

Audience Engagement

Winning Audiences

Powered by Community

Animating Democracy

Arts & the Military

Scaling Up Programs & Projects

Social Impact & Evaluation

Humor & Social Change

Private Sector Initatives

Arts & Business Partnerships

Business Models in the Arts

Local Arts Agencies

Cultural Districts

Economic Development

Trends, Collaborations & Audiences

Art in Rural Communities

Alec Baldwin and Nigel Lythgoe talk about the state of the arts in America at Arts Advocacy Day 2012. The acclaimed actor and famed producer discuss arts education and what inspires them.