Gladstone Payton

Yesterday, the House Education and Workforce Committee voted to approve HR 1891, the resolution sponsored by Rep. Duncan Hunter (R-CA) that terminates the authorization of 43 U.S. Department of Education programs, including the Arts in Education program.

This bill marks the first attempt at reauthorizing the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA), popularly know of late as “No Child Left Behind.” The Committee is promising to move several like pieces of legislation in the coming months toward remaking ESEA.

The Arts in Education program is invaluable to many communities across the country as it funds not only professional development opportunities for arts educators in high-poverty areas, but it also provides money to model programs that support “the enhancement, expansion, documentation, evaluation, and dissemination of innovative, cohesive models that demonstrate effectiveness in: integrating into and strengthening arts in the core elementary and middle school curricula; strengthening arts instruction in those grades; and improving students’ academic performance, including their skills in creating, performing, and responding to the arts.” 

I attended the markup session and worked with staff from both parties to oppose termination of the Arts in Education program.

During consideration of the measure, Reps. Rush Holt (D-NJ), Lynn Woolsey (D-CA), Susan Davis (D-CA), and David Wu (D-OR) sponsored an amendment that would amend HR 1891 to support a “well rounded education” and give the Secretary of Education the ability to fund arts education, foreign language, and history programs if so desired (You can view Rep. Holt’s introduction of the amendment on YouTube). Unfortunately, the amendment was defeated by a 16-23 party line vote.

The measure could go to the full House for a floor vote soon, so we will continue to work with House and Senate education leaders to determine if the legislation has any traction as Congress continues to work on all the many pieces of ESEA reauthorization.

2 Responses to “Federal Arts Education Program UPDATE”

  1. Rosalia says:

    What happened to HR-1891? An update, please.

  2. Tim Mikulski says:

    Rosalia, the bill never went anywhere after committee passage.

Leave a Reply

ARTSblog holds week-long Blog Salons, a series of posts by guest bloggers, that focus on an overarching theme within a core area of Americans for the Arts' work. Here are links to the most recent Salons:

Arts Education

Early Arts Education

Common Core Standards

Quality, Engagement & Partnerships

Emerging Leaders

Taking Communities to the Next Level

New Methods & Models

Public Art

Best Practices

Evaluation

Arts Marketing

Audience Engagement

Winning Audiences

Powered by Community

Animating Democracy

Arts & the Military

Scaling Up Programs & Projects

Social Impact & Evaluation

Humor & Social Change

Private Sector Initatives

Arts & Business Partnerships

Business Models in the Arts

Local Arts Agencies

Cultural Districts

Economic Development

Trends, Collaborations & Audiences

Art in Rural Communities

Alec Baldwin and Nigel Lythgoe talk about the state of the arts in America at Arts Advocacy Day 2012. The acclaimed actor and famed producer discuss arts education and what inspires them.